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Inside Nature Newsletter

People at the Heart: Conservation in Partnership with Indigenous Peoples and Local Communities

Hands hold beaded hearts made by Northern Rangelands Trust-Trading's BeadWORKS artisans in Kenya.
BeadWORKS Hands hold beaded hearts made by Northern Rangelands Trust-Trading's BeadWORKS artisans in Kenya. © Roshni Lodhia
The Inside Nature newsletter is created twice annually for some of The Nature Conservancy's most dedicated supporters. Learn more about our special membership levels.

 

Conservation is part of the long arc of history.

Since 1951, The Nature Conservancy has worked around the world to restore forests and grasslands, protect rivers and streams  and safeguard oceans and coasts.
 
While we have much to be proud of, we understand that the most enduring conservation is led by the Indigenous Peoples and local communities whose lives and livelihoods have been intrinsically linked to those natural systems since time immemorial.
 
Today, TNC supports Indigenous and local communities across 24 countries. We offer technical assistance to nomadic herders in Mongolia and access to allies and markets to artisans in Kenya. Building on our decades of experience with controlled burning in fire-dependent landscapes, we collaborate with and learn about fire from Indigenous communities in North America.
 
In this issue of Inside Nature, you can read more about these efforts and meet some of our leaders who are challenging our thinking and ensuring  that our work in partnership with Indigenous Peoples and local communities is built on respect and reciprocity.
 
These relationships are built at the speed of trust—and that truism applies to our relationship with you, too. We are grateful for your support, because it gives us the resources to follow each community’s vision for the lands and waters they steward toward a future when we all thrive .

Newsletter Article Archive

Explore more on-the-ground conservation success stories from around the globe.

The communities are able to convert a low-value product, raw wool, into valuable commodities such as socks, shoes and bags that can be sold to other herders and tourists.
Mongolian boys shearing sheep The communities are able to convert a low-value product, raw wool, into valuable commodities such as socks, shoes and bags that can be sold to other herders and tourists. © Ted Wood